(Bloomberg Business) -- Wednesday's trading outage on the New York Stock Exchange is the latest in a long list of technical glitches that have marred U.S. stock markets in recent years.

Here's a quick rundown of Wall Street's most memorable malfunctions.

Nasdaq OMX Group had a three-hour stock freeze on Aug. 22, 2013. A confluence of computer mishaps, including a flood of inaccurate data, that culminated in the failure of the exchange's backup systems was blamed for the market's stall.

Goldman Sachs Group, on Aug. 20, 2013, sent thousands of mistaken orders that roiled the U.S. options market. The bank didn't have adequate safeguards to prevent its computers from placing about 16,000 mis-priced options orders that day, the SEC said in a statement last month. The bank recently agreed to pay a $7 million fine to settle the regulatory claims.

Knight Capital Group lost more than $450 million in August 2012 when improperly installed software caused it to bombard stock exchanges with unintended orders. The company joined with Getco to form KCG Holdings in 2013.

Nasdaq OMX Group botched Facebook on May 18, 2012 when the computer matching the first trade went into a loop. The exchange operator was fined $10 million by the SEC and in April said it set aside $31 million to settle litigation stemming from the ordeal.

Bats Global Markets's initial public offering on its own exchange was derailed by a software error. The March 23, 2012 computer malfunction also forced a halt in Apple shares. Transactions in Apple and trades for more than 1 million Bats shares were later canceled.

The so-called "flash crash" of May 6, 2010 briefly erased almost $1 trillion from U.S. stock prices. While Washington regulators did a five-month autopsy of the event that year, a U.K.-based trader named Navinder Singh Sarao was fingered this April for allegedly exacerbating the market plunge.

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