The Foundation for Financial Planning has tapped an AARP executive to lead its mission to provide pro bono financial planning to the underserved.

Jon Dauphiné was named the foundation's executive director, effective Jan. 1, the nonprofit announced on Thursday. He replaces Jim Peniston, who is retiring after 13 years of service.

Dauphiné becomes the second executive director in the foundation's history.  He will be responsible for strengthening ties to the foundation's partner organizations and taking an active role in fundraising efforts. 

He will also lead the foundation's relocation from Atlanta to Washington, D.C., which the nonprofit also announced in the same press release.

For the last eight years, Dauphiné served as AARP's senior vice president of education and outreach, leading its consumer and stakeholder programs.

Prior to that, he led the development of AARP strategies related to economic issues with a focus on helping low- and moderate-income people achieve lifelong financial security. He was with AARP for 15 years, the foundation said.

"The Board of Trustees sought a combination of exceptional leadership and experience that would take the organization to the next level in its development," said Bernie Clark, chair of the foundation's board of trustees. "Jon Dauphiné provides that and more."

The foundation delivers financial planning to military families, survivors of domestic abuse, first-time homebuyers and others in need. It has also partnered with Financial Planning for the publication's annual Pro Bono Awards. 

"When people are struggling or in a financial crisis, often the help of a caring professional can make all the difference," Dauphiné said in a statement. "I am looking forward to working in partnership with the board of the Foundation for Financial Planning to build on its wonderful legacy of delivering this service pro bono to those most in need."

The foundation decided to transition its operations to Washington, D.C., in order to be closer to key national associations and nonprofits that have similar missions and are based there. The idea is to foster new partnerships and relationships to grow the foundation's scale and impact, it said. The organization will remain fully operational through its transition.

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