Our daily roundup of retirement news your clients may be thinking about.

Hundreds of companies now help employees pay student loans
Many employers are offering assistance to their employees to repay their student loan debt, an incentive that helps lure new talents and workers build their nest egg, according to this article on CNBC. Experts are expecting more companies to offer student loan assistance, but the lack of tax benefits could stall the growing popularity of this benefit. "Congress needs to take the next step and make this benefit tax free. Most people don't remember that 401(k) plans started in exactly the same way about 35 to 40 years ago," says an expert.


Is it too soon to tap retirement funds?
Workers have to wait until they turn 59 1/2 before drawing funds from their 401(k) or IRA to avoid a hefty early withdrawal penalty, according to this article on personal finance website Motley Fool. They should also delay tapping into their retirement accounts if they think they have not saved enough and will need more time to save and grow their retirement savings. However, seniors should not wait too long to start tapping into their accounts, as they have to start taking required minimum distributions at age 70 1/2 and owe income taxes on these mandatory withdrawals.

Clients are worth more than their stuff
Creating a meaningful legacy is more than simply engaging in estate planning and leaving wealth to loved ones, writes an expert on Kiplinger. Legacy planning should account for more fulfillment and purpose in life, enable clients to build a closer, functional family, and raising children with high level of self-esteem, filial loyalty, principles and independence, among others, writes the expert. These things make up "the heart of your legacy plan — the often-overlooked but most important aspect of truly capturing your essence as a person and furthering your vision for the future."

Opinion: All the ways to mess up a 401(k) — even if you max out contributions
Workers who want to improve their retirement prospects are advised to make the most of their 401(k) plan by contributing to their account consistently, according to this article on MarketWatch. They should also invest their savings in the plan, contribute enough to get their employer's match and avoid paying high fees.