After driving to the office the other day, I realized that while I remembered getting into the car, the next thing I knew I was pulling up to my parking space. It was as if I was on autopilot. Clearly, it's dangerous to be mentally checked out while driving. But it occurred to me that it's just as dangerous to be less than fully attentive while working with clients.

Psychologists refer to attentiveness and "staying in the present" as mindfulness. There is more to mindfulness than just being present, though. In fact, practicing this technique allows us to be observers of our own thoughts and feelings, remaining distant, objective and nonjudgmental. This can be useful in your practice and in your life.

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