The financial planning profession is finally feeling the pressure of years without an established career path.

The field has lost potential new entrants to others that pay higher -- at least initially -- and many students don't even follow through on their studies to bother taking the CFP examination. There is heavy competition for the relatively few unattached experienced advisors, mainly due to the fact that firms can assign client responsibilities to these hires immediately, without extra training, and expect them to start generating revenue immediately -- especially if they have an existing book of business. Yet with big demand and small supply, prices are high (and continue to escalate) for this type of advisor.

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