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A new way to find holiday gifts for clients

Finding the perfect gift for clients can be challenging. Dynasty Financial wants to change that.

The firm launched its first online holiday pop-up store where advisors can purchase gifts branded with their logo for clients and employees on Nov. 5.

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“It’s such a good way for firms to promote their brand in their market,” says Dynasty's chief experience officer, Amanda Kerley. “It seemed like a no-brainer.”

“We wanted to cut the stress out and alleviate the headache,” says Dynasty’s chief experience officer, Amanda Kerley. The store is slated to stay open for three weeks. It will close Nov. 22 to give manufacturers, Kerley and her team time to have the gifts ready for delivery by the week of Dec. 9.

A former advisor herself, Kerley says she understands the pressure the holidays bring. A lot of planning goes into clients' gifts — from finding something fitting at a good price point to shipping it in time for clients to enjoy their present during the holiday season. “It’s such a good way for firms to promote their brand in their market,” Kerley says. “It seemed like a no-brainer.”

Advisors can choose from approximately 14 items curated by Kerley and her team, including a wine package, wool blankets and outerwear at prices ranging from $22 to $105.

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Advisors can choose from approximately 14 items curated by Kerley and her team, including a wine package, wool blankets and outerwear at prices ranging from $22 to $105.

“We wanted [advisors] to be able to choose whatever makes sense for their clients,” she says.

Since the pop-up launched, orders have been constant according to Kerley. There are already favorite gifts among shoppers. Recently, a firm purchased 200 corkcicle canteens — a copper stainless steel bottle used to keep drinks hot or cold. Opening a year-round store has been discussed pending the success of the holiday pop-up.

“We didn’t know how people would react,” Kerley says. “That’s why we wanted to start it with a three week pop-up shop to see how things worked.”

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