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Trump’s budget could open up this tax-free savings account to people on Medicare

Trump’s budget could open up this tax-free savings account to people on Medicare
The Trump administration unveiled its proposed budget that includes provisions that would enable Medicare beneficiaries to contribute to a health savings account, according to this article on CNBC. Under existing laws, retirees cannot make contributions to this tax-advantaged account, which is funded on a pre-tax basis, offers tax-free growth on savings and tax-exempt withdrawals for qualified expenses. The proposal would benefit older workers who use Medicare as a secondary payer and people who want to sign up for Medicare Advantage with a Medicare medical savings account, says an expert with the Kaiser Family Foundation.

President Trump Signing Order White House
U.S. President Donald Trump poses for photographs after signing an Executive Order related to the review of the Dodd-Frank Act in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Feb. 3, 2017. Trump will order a sweeping review of the Dodd-Frank Act rules enacted in response to the 2008 financial crisis, a White House official said, signing an executive action Friday designed to significantly scale back the regulatory system put in place in 2010. Photographer: Aude Guerrucci/Pool via Bloomberg

Indexing for retirees’ life expectancy could help fix Social Security’s finances: Opinion
The government can address Social Security’s financial woes by indexing retirement benefits to life expectancy, which has increased in recent decades, according to this opinion piece on MarketWatch. “While life expectancy does not increase the size of the monthly payment, it changes the number of checks that a retiree expects to collect,” this opinion piece explains. “Increased longevity means that workers are more likely attain the age of eligibility, and that retirees will tend to collect over a longer period of time. In other words, the overall retirement protection provided by Social Security expands with life expectancy.”

6 tips for last-minute IRA contributions
An expert with Morningstar says that clients who want to make last-minute contributions to an IRA to minimize their tax burden for 2018 should consider their current and future tax rates to determine whether they should direct the funds to a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA. “If you think that your tax rate is high today and you can make a deductible contribution, you are probably better off doing that--taking the tax break now because it's worth more to you than when you pull the money out in retirement and you are in a lower tax bracket,” says the expert. “If the flip side is true, if you think you are in a relatively low tax bracket today and your tax rate is likely to go higher in the future, you are probably better off doing the Roth IRA contribution.”

IRA inheritance: Everything you need to know
IRA investors are required to name their account beneficiaries who will inherit their assets when they die, according to this article on Motley Fool. While beneficiaries can take a lump-sum distribution of the entire balance, clients who inherited their spouse’s IRA have the option of rolling over the inherited assets into their own IRA. However, once the inherited assets in their IRA, distributions will be subject to 10% early withdrawal penalty if they withdraw the money before turning 59 1/2. Surviving spouses will not face the penalty if they withdraw the funds directly from the inherited IRA.

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