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Will the government shutdown delay Social Security benefits?

Will the government shutdown delay my Social Security benefits?
Retirees can expect no delay in their Social Security benefits this year despite the partial government shutdown, according to this article from Kiplinger. The Social Security Administration has announced that the program has secured funding through September 2019. This means that the services will not be interrupted by the shutdown and retirees will continue to receive their benefits on time.

Social Security-checks
Social Security checks are printed at the U.S. Treasury Philadelphia Finance Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on February 11, 2005. Photographer: Dennis Brack/Bloomberg News

Aging parents and the truth about their longevity
Increased longevity can pose a serious challenge for families who are responsible to care for their sick elders, writes a Forbes contributor. While families may have to take the brunt of paying for their elders' board-and-care homes and feel the guilt that accompanies the decision, this can be the only reasonable option left for these families, writes the expert. "Longevity is great, but if you are a caregiver, you may need some relief ... Taking care of yourself is essential."

Here's how to invest after retirement
Seniors may want to invest in low-risk investments after retirement to create a steady source of income, prolong their nest eggs and mitigate rising interest rates, taxes and other risks in their portfolio, according to this article on Nasdaq’s website. These investment options include dividend stocks, bonds, immediate annuities, mutual funds and exchange traded funds. Treasury inflation-protected securities and real estate investment trusts are other options worth considering.

Leave behind more than your money: Communication is key to a successful legacy
Clients who intend to leave a legacy to their loved ones should ensure that they include an estate plan in their retirement plans, writes a certified estate planner for Kiplinger. The breakdown in trust and communication within the family is the main cause of wealth-transfer failure, writes the expert, citing a study by the Williams Group. To ensure the success of the transfer, seniors should work on relationships and reconciliation, explain their values to their loved ones and discuss their legacy plan with their heirs.

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