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The bucket approach for clients in their 50s

Our daily roundup of retirement news your clients may be thinking about.

The bucket approach for investing in your 50s
Clients are usually in the best position to build their nest egg in their 50s, as they reach their peak savings ability around this time, writes a certified financial planner for Kiplinger. They are advised to use the bucket approach and diversify their tax positioning when investing for retirement, writes the expert. "This can be done by contributing to three 'buckets': taxable, IRA (pretax) and Roth (posttax)."

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NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 25: Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange during early trading on April 25, 2013 in New York City. Following news of a better-than-expected report on jobless claims and many positive earnings reports, stocks opened higher with the Dow Jones industrial average rising 0.1% in morning trading. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Why I don't like target-date mutual funds
Target-date mutual funds are a great strategy for clients who are looking for easier ways to invest for retirement, according to this article on personal finance website Motley Fool. Although these funds gradually shift to safer investments as investors approach retirement and reduce the sequence-of-returns risk in their portfolio, their asset allocation could become too conservative. An alternative to target-date mutual funds is the bucket approach, which allows clients to hold appropriate assets in buckets earmarked for certain financial goals.

Toast 2019 with these retirement New Year's resolutions
A survey by Principal Financial Group has found that 21% of American consumers intend to save more money for retirement in 2019, according to this article from CNBC. "The new year is a chance for new opportunities and a clean slate. The challenge will be taking those good intentions and making them last into February and beyond," says an expert. Read the article to know some New Year's resolutions that clients may want to adopt to improve their retirement prospects this year.

Taking early retirement
Retiring early is an attractive option but can be a wrong move, as it could result in boredom and social isolation, writes a Forbes contributor. "Retiring young is not without its issues. But there are ways to make it work," writes the expert. "First off, before you leave the workforce, make sure you have something meaningful to go to. Just walking out and thinking you're heading into paradise will likely lead to disappointments."

6 guidelines for a happy retirement
Want to have a fulfilling retirement? Clients are advised to set goals and have a bucket list of activities that will make them productive, according to this MarketWatch article. They should also consider sharing their professional expertise, continue learning and pursue their creativity. Passing down their legacy and life lessons to their loved ones can also help make their retirement meaningful.

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